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Name the Grand’s Brand-New Falls
Last August, a flash flood in the Grand Canyon rerouted Havasu Creek and wiped out 75-foot Navajo Falls, a favorite swimming hole for weary backpackers. In its place: two newly created and yet unnamed cataracts. The Havasupai tribe is busy rebuilding the end of the ten-mile trail to the reservation and plans to reopen it this spring. Join one of veteran outfitter AOA Adventures’ five-day Canyon Adventurer trips to the canyon bottom to see the forces of nature at work ($1,497; aoa-adventures.com). The hike switchbacks down the south rim of the Grand Canyon, then runs along arroyos and through stepped walls layered in red and beige that rise 3,000 feet from the narrow canyon floor. It steers through the dusty village of Supai, home of the last mule-train-serviced post office in the country, then ends ceremoniously at hundred-foot aqua blue Havasu Falls. The outfitter’s exclusive tented base camp, with linens, a library, and ice for gin and tonics, is staked in a shady grove of cottonwoods by a creek. Before packing out, hikers have four days to explore the remade wildland.
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  • Alcohol is not allowed on Indian reservations. The base camp is located in the campground which is p…
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