email a friend iconprinter friendly iconCaught in Bandit Cross Fire
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How to Survive

Before traveling to an unstable country, engage in what security pros call “journey management.” Set up prearranged times to call a friend who’ll alert authorities if you don’t arrive at a destination. If possible, arrange a fixer or, on the cheap, find a local university student looking to practice English. You’ll need someone who knows the terrain intimately and can get you to safe locations. “You want lily pads in the sea of hostility,” says Ed Daly, director of watch operations for iJET, a risk management company. Monitor the State Department’s website for travel warnings and find regional blogs that give a more nuanced sense of the ground scene. Wear drab clothes—no ball caps or sunglasses—and carry small gifts like cigarettes or candy that can smooth tense situations. (!!) Should a serious conflict erupt, head immediately to the airport, but remember that everyone else will too. If commercial options are no longer available, go to the closest U.S. Embassy, which will evac citizens for a price (you’ll pay the going rate for the last commercial flight out). If possible, attach yourself to a friendly military force. On the road, be prepared to encounter checkpoints: Stay calm and move slowly if stopped. Should you get kidnapped for ransom, relax. According to Clayton Consultants, a crisis management consultancy, some 95 percent of kidnappings can be resolved with a payoff. In the meantime, don’t volunteer unnecessary information. Escape attempts should be exercised only as a last resort. “If you feel like you’re going to get murdered anyway, I would try to escape—steal some food, study the guards, and look for an opportunity, since the worst-case outcome would be just as fatal as staying,” says Tim Crockett, a former British special forces soldier and executive director of AKE, an international security company.

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