Twenty of the world’s top adventurers share the dazzling new frontiers they’ve discovered, as well as their all-time classic trips to add to your list. Plus: Don’t miss the must-have gear they take on every trip. —Kate Siber

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Picture of a bicyclist crossing a river along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, Vietnam

A cyclist crosses a river along the Ho Chi Minh Trail, Vietnam.

Photograph by Mark Jenkins

Rebecca Rusch

Mountain Biker

The Vietnamese used the Ho Chi Minh Trail, a nest of jungle-choked paths and roads through the mountains, to ferry supplies during the Vietnam War, and they largely did it with bicycles. Now, travelers hike and bike these capillaries to see an intimate view of the country. Few, however, do the entire length of it. Except, naturally, for Rusch, who plans to ride roughly 800 miles of it.

“You’d be going through villages and jungle and all sorts of cultural travel experiences,” she says. “That’s one of the things I think is so great about a bike is to travel and explore and get off the beaten path.” This path certainly isn’t well beaten, as it traces the ridgelines of the Annamite Mountains, passes through tiny villages, and skirts verdant terraced agricultural lands.

Rusch would like to go for an even deeper reason, too: to visit the site where her father’s plane was shot down during the Vietnam War.

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Athlete Bio

Picture of bicyclist Rebecca Rusch
Rebecca Rusch

Mountain Biker

Rebecca Rusch has won a flock of adventure races, the whitewater rafting national championships, and the masters cross-country skiing world championships. But that was all before she started biking. In the last seven years, she has become a cyclocross state champion and the 24-hour solo mountain bike national champion, and she has won the Leadville Trail 100 Mountain Bike Race, a preeminent endurance test, four times in a row.

Rebecca Rusch's Gear Pick

  • Picture of the Garmin Edge

    Garmin 510 Bike Computer

    “The Garmin 510 is like my little brain that goes on my handlebar,” Rusch says. “It’s my everyday training computer. I like it because the numbers are a little bigger than other models and it has a touch screen that responds to pressure, not heat, so you can use it with gloves on.”